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  • January 14, 2018

    Car hacking remains a very real threat as autos become ever more loaded with tech

    "Justin Cappos, a computer science professor at New York University's Tanden School of Engineering, said one of the more promising ways to stay ahead of hackers is through regular over-the-air software updates to fix vulnerabilities as soon as they become known.

    For example, Tesla last summer sent out updates to all Tesla Model Xs after Chinese security researchers managed to turn on a Model X's brakes remotely and to get the doors and trunk to open and close while blinking the lights in time to music streamed from the vehicle's audio system.

    “I will say that the automotive companies have really come a long way and have made strides," Cappos said. “But it’s really hard when you are making something as complicated as cars, and you are buying components of the cars from vendors … to get everyone to fix their security and get on the same page.”"

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  • January 9, 2018

    Separation of Powers Objections to the Iran Nuclear Agreement

    "In a recently published , “Taking Steel Seizure Seriously: The Iran Nuclear Agreement and the Separation of Powers,” 86 Fordham L. Rev. 1199 (2017), Steven Menashi and I question the constitutional validity of President Barack Obama's decision, as part of the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action agreement with Iran and five other countries, to repeal, in effect, seventeen different Iran-related nuclear sanctions provisions for the JCPOA’s 15-year term. Despite the fact that Congress had legislated extensively in this area, Obama effected this change by entering into a “nonbinding political agreement” with Iran and by aggregating individual waiver provisions in existing sanctions laws into an across-the-board waiver of sanctions." Read more >
  • January 8, 2018

    Wikileaks Shared Entire ‘Fire and Fury’ Manuscript Online

    "WikiLeaks has shared a link to the tell-all book about Donald Trump’s White House that has made waves in Washington, D.C. In a move that appeared to have the success of Michael Wolff’s tome Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House firmly in its crosshairs, the organization tweeted out a link to a full PDF of the book, which may have constituted copyright infringement. The original post read: "New Trump book 'Fire and Fury' by Michael Wolff. Full PDF" and shared a link to the PDF, but this was later replaced by a second post that shared a link and observed that the text was leaked onto the internet." Read more >
  • January 3, 2018

    Can States Fix the G.O.P. Tax Law?

    "Some conservatives have been almost gleeful that the Republican tax overhaul will hurt people who live in high-cost states like California, New Jersey and New York. An economist who has advised President Trump called it “death to Democrats.”

    But their celebrations may have been premature. In their rush to enact tax cuts before the end of 2017, Mr. Trump and Republican leaders in Congress created a legislative monster riddled with flaws and loopholes that even they don’t fully understand. They have offered up a bonanza to tax lawyers and accountants looking for provisions that can be exploited to lower taxes for clients."

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  • December 31, 2017

    The GOP tax plan creates one of the largest new loopholes in decades

    "The tax plan that President Trump signed into law last week creates one of the largest new loopholes in decades: a 20% deduction for “pass-through income.” Pass-through income is business income that is immediately “passed through” to the owner’s personal tax return, thereby avoiding the corporate income tax. Proponents of the Republican tax plan claim the cut benefits small businesses, but that’s a red herring. In reality, the new deduction disproportionately benefits the wealthy, penalizes workers and, in part because it is so complex, will ultimately reward those who can afford the best tax advice. " Read more >