Faculty & Speakers

Legal Expertise at the Intersection of
Business, Policy, and Strategy

The Institute for Executive Education draws on the faculty of NYU Law, who are leaders in a wide range of disciplines, and brings in leading practitioners and experts to create top quality programs for professionals looking to develop their careers.

  • Stephanie Abramson

    Business Law

    Stephanie Abramson has an extensive and varied background in financing transactions, corporate law and transactional representation, as both outside counsel and as general counsel to several global companies. Abramson practiced corporate law at Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen & Hamilton and Morgan, Lewis & Bockius. She has been Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary of Young & Rubicam Inc., Chief Legal Officer and Chief Corporate Development Officer of Heidrick & Struggles International, Inc. and most recently the Executive Vice President and General Counsel of DoubleClick, Inc. (acquired by Google Inc. in March 2008). Abramson is a member of the Board of Trustees of the New York University School of Law.

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  • Philip G. Alston

    International Law

    Philip Alston teaches international law, international criminal law, and a range of human rights subjects. Alston has degrees in law and economics from the University of Melbourne and a JSD from Berkeley. He previously taught at the European University Institute, the Australian National University, Harvard Law School, and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. Alston was one of the founders of both the European and the Australian and New Zealand societies of international law and was editor-in-chief of the European Journal of International Law from 1996 through 2007. In 2014, Alston was appointed by the UN Human Rights Council as its Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights. From 2004 to 2010, he was UN Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial executions, undertaking official missions to Sri Lanka, Nigeria, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Philippines, Israel, Lebanon, Albania, Kenya, Brazil, Central African Republic, Afghanistan, and the United States. Alston has also been on the Independent International Commission on Kyrgyzstan (2011) and the UN Group of Experts on Darfur (2007) and served as Special Adviser to the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights on the Millennium Development Goals (2002-07); chairperson (1991-98) and rapporteur (1987-91) of the UN Committee on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights; and UNICEF’s Senior Legal Adviser on children’s rights (1986-92).

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  • José Enrique Alvarez

    International Law

    A former president of the American Society of International Law and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the Institut de Droit International, José Enrique Alvarez has made substantial scholarly contributions to a wide range of subjects within international law, including the law-generating roles of international organizations, the challenges facing international criminal tribunals, and the international investment regime. Along with NYU colleague Benedict Kingsbury, Alvarez is the co-editor-in-chief of the leading peer-reviewed journal in the field, the American Journal of International Law. Alvarez has been a special adviser on international law to the prosecutor of the International Criminal Court, an attorney adviser with the Office of the Legal Adviser of the US Department of State, and has taught at Columbia, the University of Michigan, George Washington, and Georgetown law schools. His series of lectures at The Hague Academy of International Law on the subject of foreign investment was subsequently published as The Public International Law Regime Governing International Investment (2011). His general course on public international law at the Xiamen Academy of International Law, a series of fifteen lectures delivered at China’s Xiamen University in 2013, is expected to be published as a monograph in the near future.

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  • Joshua Blank

    Tax Law

    Since 2010, Joshua Blank has served as professor of tax practice and faculty director of the Graduate Tax Program at NYU School of Law. Blank’s scholarship focuses on tax administration and compliance, taxpayer privacy and tax transparency, and taxation of business entities. His scholarly articles have appeared in University of Pennsylvania Law Review, UCLA Law Review, New York University Law Review, Emory Law Journal, and Tax Law Review, among others. Blank’s research has been profiled by the mainstream media, including the New York Times, Reuters, and Forbes. In 2014, Blank received the Podell Distinguished Teaching Award from NYU Law. Blank served as vice chair of the Teaching Taxation Committee of the Tax Section of the American Bar Association from 2009 to 2013. From 2008 to 2009, Blank was an assistant professor of law at Rutgers School of Law–Newark. From 2006 to 2008, he served as an acting assistant professor of tax law at NYU Law. Prior to entering academia, Blank was a tax lawyer at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz.

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  • Ryan Bubb

    Business Law

    Ryan Bubb joined the NYU School of Law faculty in Fall 2010. He was formerly a senior researcher for the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission, created by Congress to examine the causes of the recent financial crisis, and a policy analyst at the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs at the Office of Management and Budget. He earned a JD from Yale Law School and a PhD in political economy and government from Harvard University. Bubb’s research focuses on regulatory policy, financial institutions, and business organizations.

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  • Stephen Choi

    Corporate Law

    Stephen Choi joined the NYU School of Law faculty in 2005. From 1998 to 2005, Choi taught at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law, where he was the Roger J. Traynor Professor of Law. Prior to that, he taught as an assistant professor at the University of Chicago Law School from 1996 to 1998. He graduated first in his class from Harvard Law School in 1994—where he served as a legal methods instructor and supervising editor of the Harvard Law Review—and received his PhD in economics from Harvard in 1997. Choi has been a recipient of the Fay Diploma, the Sears Prize, and the Irving Oberman Memorial Award. He has also held John M. Olin, Jacob K. Javits, and Fulbright fellowships. After his graduation from law school, Choi worked as an associate at McKinsey & Company in New York. His research interests focus on the theoretical and empirical analysis of corporations and capital markets. He has published in the Yale Law Journal, Stanford Law Review, University of Chicago Law Review, Michigan Law Review, Southern California Law Review, Duke Law Journal, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, and Virginia Law Review, among others, and has presented papers at numerous conferences and symposia.

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  • Kevin Davis

    Business Law

    Kevin Davis teaches courses on contracts, regulation of foreign corrupt practices, secured transactions, and law and development, as well as seminars on financing development and contract theory. His current research is focused on contract law, anticorruption law, and the general relationship between law and economic development. Davis received his BA in economics from McGill University in 1990. After graduating with an LLB from the University of Toronto in 1993, he served as law clerk to Justice John Sopinka of the Supreme Court of Canada and later as an associate in the Toronto office of Torys, a Canadian law firm. After receiving an LLM from Columbia University in 1996, he was appointed an assistant professor at the University of Toronto and in 2001 was promoted to associate professor. Davis has also been a visiting assistant professor at the University of Southern California, a visiting fellow at Cambridge University’s Clare Hall, and a visiting lecturer at the University of the West Indies in Barbados.

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  • Zachary Goldman

    Law and Security

    Zachary K. Goldman is the Executive Director of the Center on Law and Security and an Adjunct Professor of Law at NYU School of Law. Goldman returned to NYU after having served for several years in the US government.  He first served as a policy advisor in the US Department of the Treasury’s Office of Terrorism and Financial Intelligence, where he was the subject matter expert on terrorist financing in the Arabian Peninsula, and worked on the development of Iran sanctions policy. He then served at the US Department of Defense as a Special Assistant to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. In the private sector, Goldman worked in the litigation department of Sullivan & Cromwell LLP in New York.

    He has published on national security strategy, financial sanctions, cybersecurity, counterterrorism, and US foreign policy in outlets such as the New York TimesForeign AffairsThe Financial Times Chinese, Political Science Quarterly, Cold War History, The Atlantic, The Diplomat, The National Interest, and others. He is the co-editor, with Samuel Rascoff, of Intelligence Oversight: A Global View, an edited volume on comparative approaches to the oversight of intelligence agencies, which will be published by Oxford University Press in 2016.

    Goldman is a Term Member of the Council on Foreign Relations, an Adjunct Senior Fellow at the Center for a New American Security, a member of the Advisory Committee to the American Bar Association’s Standing Committee on Law and National Security, and a Member of the New York City Mayor’s Committee on City Marshals. He received his JD from New York University School of Law, his Masters in International Relations from the London School of Economics, and his BA from Harvard University.

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  • Annemarie Hassett

    Intellectual Property

    Annemarie Hassett became the executive director of the NYU Law’s Engelberg Center on Innovation Law and Policy on January 12, following a distinguished career in complex civil litigation, in particular intellectual property litigation.

    Hassett has been a litigator for more than 30 years, most recently as a senior partner at Goodwin Procter in its patent litigation practice.  She was also a partner at Kirkland and Ellis and a member of the firm’s intellectual property litigation practice, and practiced at Fish & Neave. Hassett received her BS in chemistry from the State University of New York at Albany, MA in chemistry from Harvard University, and JD from Hastings College of the Law, University of California. She is currently second vice president and serves on the board of the New York Intellectual Property Law Association.

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  • Mitchell Kane

    Mitchell Kane

    Tax Law

    After graduating from law school, Mitchell Kane clerked for the Honorable Karen LeCraft Henderson of the US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit. He then worked as an associate in the tax department of Covington & Burling. His current research focuses on tax and economic development, tax and climate policy, and transfer pricing. Kane joined the NYU School of Law faculty in 2008 from the University of Virginia School of Law, where he had taught since 2003. Kane received a BA from Yale University in 1993, a JD from the University of Virginia School of Law in 1996, and an MA from the University of Virginia in 1997.

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  • Benedict Kingsbury

    International Law

    Benedict Kingsbury’s broad, theoretically grounded approach to international law closely integrates work in legal theory, political theory, and history. With NYU colleague Richard Stewart, he initiated and directs the Global Administrative Law Research Project, a pioneering approach to issues of accountability and participation in global governance. They launched the Global Administrative Law Network, and together with Andrew Hurrell edit the Law and Global Governance book series for Oxford University Press. Kingsbury has directed the Law School’s Institute for International Law and Justice since its founding in 2002. He and NYU Professor José Alvarez became the editors-in-chief of the century-old American Journal of International Law in 2013. Kingsbury has written on a wide range of international law topics, from trade-environment disputes and indigenous peoples issues to interstate arbitration, investor-state arbitration, and the proliferation of international tribunals. His edited volumes include Governance by Indicators (2012), and books on Hugo Grotius (1583-1645) and Alberico Gentili (1552-1608). After completing his LLB with first-class honors at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand in 1981, Kingsbury was a Rhodes Scholar at Balliol College, Oxford. In 1984, he graduated at the top of his class in the MPhil program in international relations at Oxford. He subsequently completed a DPhil in law at Oxford and has taught at Oxford, Duke, Harvard Law School, the University of Tokyo, the University of Paris 1, and the University of Utah.

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  • Sonia Marciano

    Strategy

    Sonia Marciano is a Clinical Full Professor of Management and Organizations at New York University Stern School of Business.

    Prior to joining NYU Stern, Marciano taught Strategy at Columbia Business School and was an Institute Fellow and Senior Lecturer at Harvard University’s Institute for Strategy and Competitiveness. In Chicago, Marciano also was a Clinical Professor of Management and Strategy at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management for eight years, as well as an Adjunct Professor of Strategy at the University of Chicago. Marciano has worked in the consulting, banking and insurance industries, and has taught executive education courses for Ernst & Young and Abbott Laboratories, among others.

    Marciano received her B.A. with honors, her M.B.A. and her Ph.D. in Business Economics and Industrial Organization, all from the University of Chicago.

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  • Theodor Meron

    International Law

    Since his election to the UN International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia in March 2001, Judge Theodor Meron has served on the Appeals Chamber. He was elected president of the tribunal from 2003 to 2005 and again in 2011, and was appointed president of the UN Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals in March 2012. A leading scholar of international humanitarian law, human rights, and international criminal law, Meron helped build the legal foundations for international criminal tribunals. A Shakespeare enthusiast, he has also written extensively on the laws of war and chivalry in Shakespeare’s history plays. He received his legal education at Hebrew, Harvard, and Cambridge universities. Meron was co-editor-in-chief of the American Journal of International Law and counselor in international law to the US Department of State. In 2010, he was elected honorary president of the American Society of International Law. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the American Society of International Law, the French Society for International Law, the Institute of International Law, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Among other honors, Meron was awarded the Manley O. Hudson Medal of the American Society of International Law and the Charles Homer Haskins Prize of the American Council of Learned Societies, and he is an officer of the (French) Legion of Honor, as well as a grand officer of the (French) National Order of Merit. He was granted a doctorate honoris causa by the University of Warsaw. Since 2014, he is also visiting professor of law at the University of Oxford.

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  • Samuel Rascoff

    Law and Security

    Samuel Rascoff is an expert in national security law, and serves as faculty director of the Center on Law and Security. Named a Carnegie Scholar in 2009, Rascoff came to the Law School from the New York City Police Department, where, as director of intelligence analysis, he created and led a team responsible for assessing the terrorist threat to the city. A graduate of Harvard summa cum laude, Oxford with first class honors, and Yale Law School, Rascoff previously served as a law clerk to US Supreme Court Justice David H. Souter and to Judge Pierre N. Leval of the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. He was also a special assistant with the Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq and an associate at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz. Rascoff’s publications include “Presidential Intelligence” (Harvard Law Review); “Counterterrorism and New Deterrence” (NYU Law Review); “Establishing Official Islam? The Law and Strategy of Counter-Radicalization” (Stanford Law Review); “Domesticating Intelligence” (Southern California Law Review), and “The Law of Homegrown (Counter-) Terrorism” (Texas Law Review).

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  • David Rosenbloom

    International Tax

    H. David Rosenbloom became director of the International Tax Program in 2002. He is a member of Caplin & Drysdale, a law firm he rejoined in 1981 after serving as international tax counsel and director of the Office of International Tax Affairs in the US Department of the Treasury from 1978 to 1981. Rosenbloom graduated from Princeton University summa cum laude in 1962 and, after a year as a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Florence in Italy, attended Harvard Law School. He graduated magna cum laude in 1966 and was president of Volume 79 of the Harvard Law Review. Rosenbloom served as assistant to Ambassador Arthur Goldberg at the US Mission to the United Nations, then as clerk to US Supreme Court Justice Abe Fortas. A frequent speaker and author on tax subjects, Rosenbloom has taught international taxation and related subjects at the law schools at Stanford, Columbia, the University of Pennsylvania, and Harvard, and at educational institutions in Taipei, Mexico City, Milan, Bergamo, Sydney, Mainz, Heidelberg, Rio de Janeiro, Pretoria, Leiden, Melbourne, Bologna, Neuchatel, Vienna, and Lisbon. He has also served as a tax policy adviser for the US Treasury, the OECD, USAID, and the World Bank in Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union, Senegal, Malawi, and South Africa.

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  • Gerald Rosenfeld

    Business and Law

    Gerald Rosenfeld is advisor to the CEO and vice chairman of Investment Banking at Lazard Ltd. He has been an investment banker for over 30 years at Salomon Brothers (1979-1988), Bankers Trust Company (1988-1992), Lazard Freres (1992-1998) and Rothschild (2000-2011), before rejoining Lazard in 2011. Prior to investment banking, Dr. Rosenfeld was a consultant at McKinsey & Co. (1976-1979.) In his investment banking career, Dr. Rosenfeld has worked primarily in the area of Mergers & Acquisitions and Corporate Restructuring, including representing General Motors, Chrysler, ITT Corporation, Tenneco, Lotus, TRW, Thermo-Electron, United Airlines, TWA, and US Airways, among many others. Prof. Rosenfeld has served on several public Boards of Directors and is currently a Director of CIT Group and of Continental Grain Co. He holds a Ph.D. from New York University (1973) in Applied Mathematics and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Prof. Rosenfeld is Clinical Professor of Business at NYU Stern and Distinguished Scholar in Residence at NYU School of Law. He serves on the Board of Overseers of Stern. He is co-Director of the Law School’s Jacobson Leadership Program in Law and Business.

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  • Helen Scott

    Business Law

    Helen Scott is the co-director of the Mitchell Jacobson Leadership Program in Law and Business, a program that includes student scholarships, mentoring, research, and curricular innovation at NYU School of Law in cooperation with NYU’s Stern School of Business. She currently co-teaches two of the Law School’s unique “Law & Business of…” courses in the areas of Professional Responsibility and Corporate Governance. Scott developed and administers the Law School’s fellowships in Social Entrepreneurship and in Law, Policy and Innovation. She is currently working with the United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship on the development of a teaching certificate in social enterprise. Her seminar, Business Transactions Planning, was the first nonlitigation-based full-scale simulation course at the Law School. Along with Roy Smith of the Stern School, she developed and co-taught Entrepreneurial Finance to law and business students. Scott recently worked with the Kauffman Foundation on a project involving new ways of thinking about and teaching in the areas of entrepreneurship and innovation, one result of which is the eLaw section of the website www.entrepreneurship.org. She has served as co-chair of the Listing and Hearing Review Council of the NASDAQ Stock Market. She has also received the Legal Advocate of the Year Award from the US Small Business Administration for her work on the Angel Capital Electronic Network program. Scott remains involved with cutting-edge issues of corporate governance, financial reporting, and market globalization.

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  • Daniel Shaviro

    Tax Law

    After graduating from Princeton University and Yale Law School, Daniel Shaviro spent three years each at Caplin & Drysdale, a leading tax specialty firm, and the Joint Committee on Taxation, where he worked extensively on the Tax Reform Act of 1986. Shaviro began his teaching career at the University of Chicago Law School in 1987 and joined the NYU School of Law in 1995. His scholarly work examines tax policy, budget policy, and entitlements issues. His list of published books includes Fixing U.S. International Taxation (2014); Decoding the U.S. Corporate Tax (2009); Taxes, Spending, and the U.S. Government’s March Toward Bankruptcy (2007); Who Should Pay for Medicare? (2004);Making Sense of Social Security Reform (2000); When Rules Change: An Economic and Political Analysis of Transition Relief and Retroactivity (2000); and Do Deficits Matter? (1997). Shaviro also has published a novel,Getting It (2010), and has a blog at danshaviro.blogspot.com. At NYU Law, Shaviro teaches various tax courses, including a scholarly colloquium on tax policy and public finance.

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  • Frank Upham

    Property Law

    Frank Upham teaches Property, Law, and Development, and courses on comparative law and society with an emphasis on East Asia and the developing world. He is co-director of the US-Asia Law Institute and is the faculty program director for NYU Law Abroad in Shanghai. His scholarship focuses on Japan and China, and his book Law and Social Change in Postwar Japan received the Thomas J. Wilson Prize from Harvard University Press in 1987. Recent scholarship includes “Who Will Find the Defendant If He Stays with His Sheep? Justice in Rural China,” “From Demsetz to Deng: Speculations on the Implications of Chinese Growth for Law and Development Theory,” “Creating Law from the Ground Up: Land Law in Post-Conflict Cambodia,” and “Resistible Force Meets Malleable Object: The Story of the ‘Introduction’ of Norms of Gender Equality into Japanese Employment Practice.” Upham has spent time at various institutions in Asia and works in Japanese and Chinese. Current research interests focus on the role of property rights in economic growth from the English Enclosure movement to contemporary Cambodia. Upham graduated from Princeton University in 1967 and Harvard Law School in 1974 and worked as a journalist in Asia and as an assistant attorney general in Massachusetts before entering academia. Prior to moving to NYU School of Law in 1994, he taught at Ohio State, Harvard, and Boston College law schools.

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  • Steve C. Wrappe

    Tax Law

    Steve C. Wrappe has nearly 25 years of client and government experience in transfer pricing and tax controversy. Prior to KPMG, Wrappe led the transfer pricing controversy practice at two other Big Four firms and was a partner with a global law firm. He has transfer pricing experience across all industries, and is one of the most experienced negotiators of transfer pricing controversy. Wrappe has negotiated over 150 advance pricing agreements (APAs) and mutual agreement procedures, and negotiated the first APA coordinated with a Customs ruling. Wrappe has also been involved in international tax planning and tax provision work for multinational corporations.

    Wrappe is an adjunct faculty member at New York University School of Law, Georgetown University Law Center, and the University of Florida School of Law. He has also taught transfer pricing to the IRS, U.S. Customs, and several other tax authorities. He recently published the fourth edition of his leading treatise “Transfer Pricing: Rules, Compliance and Controversy” (with Marc Levey), and has published more than 100 articles on transfer pricing topics. Steve served as Chair of the Transfer Pricing Committee of the American Bar Association. He has consistently been recognized in Euromoney’s Guide to the World’s Leading Transfer Pricing Advisors.

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